Friday, July 3, 2015

Happy 4th of July, and how to learn from the Masters, PPF

Learning to Paint the Masters
In the style of Renoir. "Two Sisters," who are not really sisters! Above you see the original cropped version of a larger painting by Renoir, and below my acrylic painting ACEO size.
Someone suggested I paint this one for my Miniature Masterpiece series, and since the colors were Red, White and Blue, it also works for the theme this week in 30/30. I like the challenge of trying to imitate different artist's styles and seeing how close I can come to the original artwork, or at least a similarity or two. I find Renoir to be very difficult, whereas Picasso and Cezanne come easier to me. Of course, I am painting very small, 2.5 x 3.5 inches, and the originals are actually huge.

My favorite part, in addition to painting, is reading about the artist's life and how he or she came to paint the particular image that I am trying to duplicate. I was never interested in art history before, but now I am really enjoying poking around in the personal and private lives of famous artists. The more I learn about their life experiences, trials and tribulations, the more I appreciate the art. Then when I actually take brush in hand and begin the process, it has a much deeper meaning for me.

"Girl in a Chemise," by Picasso
and my slightly masculine version below.
Done during his "Blue Period" when he was actually quite depressed over the death of a friend, so he was quite "blue." 
My "Blue Nude" a la Picasso, above, is from the same time period, and I just love the emotion you can feel in the painting. Here is the original by Picasso below.

I am my own Professor of Art History right now, and if this had been the teaching method in College, I might have actually enjoyed the History of Art IA class a lot more. Have you ever tried to paint the masters?







4 comments:

  1. Wonderful work Penny the Renoir is quite fantastic...really amazing!! I'd never even attempt these....good for you!!

    Hugs Giggles

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  2. Thanks, Giggles. From what I have been reading, all of the great artists of the past studied and tried to paint the "masters" who came before them. It was considered the best way to learn.

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